The Process of Juno: Part 2 the Finale

At this point, the background is pretty solid now. As I do the fur around his face, I keep my strokes light. Always following the shape of the animal, I switch between colors to build up the thickness around his face. Keep in mind that following the pattern of the fur is extremely important, it keeps the animal very real and builds up the thick fur that a fox would have.
At this point, the background is pretty solid now. As I do the fur around his face, I keep my strokes light. Always following the shape of the animal, I switch between colors to build up the thickness around his face. Keep in mind that following the pattern of the fur is extremely important, it keeps the animal very real and builds up the thick fur that a fox would have.

I jump around throughout this piece, and really every piece I do. I do this so I can keep a balance of colors and tones. When looking at your reference, know where your lighting is coming from. This is where that balance comes from. Even though you may feel you are done with one area, when you start the next area go back and see if there is a good balance with the two sides. Most likely you will need to fix it a little, which is why you keep everything light.

Juno 6
I did the face first before Juno’s body so I could better judge the fur’s shadows. Throughout this stage I am consistently going back and forth from the body to the face to sync them together through colors and blending. No need to rush, take your time and step away if you feel you are starting to do so. I do this all of the time 🙂

 

More darks have gone in now. I am slowly increasing the pressure now for the dark areas to really push them forward. The white fur is thickening up more as well. This is where the tricky part comes in, simply because white fur isn’t let stark white. It’s the shadows that make the fur look and feel real. Light to dark as always, and I am am going back and forth with a colorless blender and OMS to blend these colors together.

Juno 11x11 colored pencil on bristol paper
When doing fur, keep your body loose. Juno is a very fluffy little guy, so if I were to have done this with a stiff wrist, it wouldn’t have looked right.                                   Juno; 11×11; Colored Pencil on Bristol Paper

We have arrived to the finish line! As I was crossing that line, I was still smoothing out the background as well. Wanting to make sure he didn’t look like a cut out, I make the background colors and the fur colors cross in a way. It is great to have those soft edges. The fine hairs and whiskers are added in with a very sharp point and I kept my wrist loose and relaxed.

Juno is completed and now it is on to the next piece! I ordered Faber Castell Polychromos pencils, can’t wait until they get here. They are a harder pencil and work really with for fine lines vs the Prismas. Also, the two brands work well together too. It’s a win win!

I am currently working and a Safe Haven painting and drawing. Also I have a butterfly piece being worked on too. To see more progress of those pieces, head over to my Facebook Fan Page to see photos. Like my page to, so you can stay in the loop 😉

If you are interested in Juno’s piece, I have him available for purchase on my website for $160.00:

www.taylorannfineart.com

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